toyota cars, crossovers, and trucks

2020-2021 Toyota News from ToyoLand

Toyota vs Honda (April 7)

Honda and Toyota have long been rivals in the USA. How did they fare in Q1 2021?

  Honda Toyota
Compact car (Civic, Corolla) 55,903 72,520
Midsize car (Accord, Camry) 46,951 78,151
Minivan (Odyssey, Sienna) 20,066 26,578
Pickup (Ridgeline, Tacoma) 12,570 66,449
Compact CUV (CR-V, RAV4) 93,766 114,255
Larger CUV (HR-V, Highlander) 26,175 63,831
Total 347,091 (+16%) 603,066 (+22%)

Sales leaped up in the first quarter of 2021

Toyota US sales jumped up in the first quarter of 2021, with an overall gain of 22% (20% Toyota brand, 32% Lexus).

The biggest gainers in percentages were the Mirai and Land Cruiser, jumping up 491% and 209% respectively; that is less exciting when you realize Mirai had quarterly sales of 869 and Land Cruiser 1,896. More important might be the gains across the Lexus line—every Lexus truck but the UX posted huge gains, from the NX (28%) to the LX (58%). Among Lexus cars, the dead GS fell by 92%, not surprisingly, while the RC stayed about the same; but the IS rocketed up by 122%, to 6,028 sales, and the other cars had good gains as well.

In the regular-guy line, the Tacoma rose by 24% while the long-obsolete, soon-to-be-replaced Tundra fell by 12% as Chevy, Ford, and Ram duke it out. The Sienna minivan made a surprise comeback, despite its new hybrid-only design, more than doubling sales; it reached 26,578 sales. That’s not going to topple the Chrysler Pacifica anytime soon, but it annualizes to six figures.

The mainstream Toyota cars all stopped their skids and posted gains for the quarter, led by the Avalon with a surprise 26% gain; like the Camry and Corolla, it is all brand-new and TNGA based. The old best-selling Camry went up by just 1%, which is better than falling, while the Corolla rose by 5%. Camry had 78,151 sales for the quarter, and Corolla had 72,520; compare that to, say, 19,740 Dodge Chargers sold during the same period (you can even add in the 5,400 Chrysler 300s and 15,096 Dodge Challengers, and Toyota would be far ahead).

These are respectable sedan sales. Yet they were made to seem trivial by the RAV4’s 114,255 sales—a 17% gain. In the higher end, 63,831 Highlanders reflected a 33% sales gain; the Sequoia, old as it is, managed 2,037 sales (up 45%) and 4Runner added 37,263. The new Venza, slotting between the slow-selling C-HR and the RAV4, managed 13,623 sales. (It might be slow-selling for Toyota, by the way, but the C-HR nearly hit Jeep Renegade numbers.)

(February 10, 2021)Toyota reporting hefty profits for 2020

Toyota reported a hefty $9.5 billion profit in the last quarter, with net income rising to $8 billion for the final quarter of 2020. The company expects to post a $19 billion operating profit for the fiscal year ending March 31, which would be a record. They sold 9.5 million cars and trucks in the world in 2020, including Daihatsu and Hino, making it the world’s largest automaker; their forecast is now 9.7 million for 2021. Toyota sold 10.5 million vehicles in 2019.

(January 28, 2021)2020 USA sales: down by 12%, Corolla and Camry hit

Toyota sold a total of 9.53 million cars and trucks in the world in 2020, including Daihatsu and Hino, making it the world’s largest automaker. Volkswagen had taken that place from 2016 to 2019, but was hit harder but COVID, which pushed VW sales down by 24% versus Toyota’s 15% drop. Global auto sales were 76.8 million across all brands and segments, giving

 

(January 28, 2021)2020 USA sales: down by 12%, Corolla and Camry hit

Toyota sold a total of 9.53 million cars and trucks in the world in 2020, including Daihatsu and Hino, making it the world’s largest automaker. Volkswagen had taken that place from 2016 to 2019, but was hit harder but COVID, which pushed VW sales down by 24% versus Toyota’s 15% drop. Global auto sales were 76.8 million across all brands and segments, giving Toyota a 12.4% market share.

(January 6, 2021)2020 USA sales: down by 12%, Corolla and Camry hit

A sea of red ink swept across Toyota’s U.S. sales for 2020—as it did across most automakers. Toyota’s mainstay cars, the Camry and Corolla, took serious hits of 13% and 22% despite being better, and better equipped, than in prior years. The Avalon fell by 34%, too. The Sienna fell by a stunning 42%, while the mainstay RAV4 fell by just 4%, allowing it to outsell pretty much any two Jeeps. Highlander sales were down by 11%. In trucks, the Tacoma fell by 4% and the Tundra by 2%, which were actually decent numbers considering stronger Detroit competition in both fields.

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